April 22, 2012

Ancient Egyptian 22, 23 and 24 Dynasties

Dynasty 22 (at Tanis)
(Libyan or Bubastite) 
945-712 BC

Sheshonq I
(meryamun)
Hedjkheperre
Setepenre
945-924 BC

Osorkon I
(meryamun)
Sekhemkheperre
924-889 BC

Sheshonq II
(meryamun)
Heqakheperre
Setepenre
c. 890

Takelot I
(meryamun)
Usermaatre
Setepenre
889-874 BC

Osorkon II
(meryamun)
Usermaatre
Setepenamun
874-850 BC

Takelot II
(meryamun)
Hedjkheperre
Setepenre
850-825 BC

Sheshonq III
(meryamun)
Usermaatre
Setepenre
825-773 BC

Pami
Usermaatre
Setepenamun
773-767 BC

Sheshonq V
Aakheperre
767-730 BC

Osorkon IV
Aakheperre
Setepenamun
730-715 BC

At Thebes
Harsiese
(meryamun)
Hedjkheperre
Setepenamun
870-860 BC

Osorkon II
(meryamun)
Usermaatre
Setepenamun
874-850

Sheshonq V
Aakheperre
767-730 BC

Osorkon IV
Aakheperre
Setepenamun
730-715 BC

At Thebes
Harsiese
(meryamun)
Hedjkheperre
Setepenamun
870-860


Dynasty 23
 (at Leontopolis)
(Libyan Anarchy)
818-712 BC

Pedibastet
(meryamun) Usermaatre
Setepenamun
818-793 BC

Sheshonq IV
Usermaatre
Meryamun
793-787

Usermaatre
Setepenamun
787-759 BC

Rudamon
Usermaatre
Setepenamun
757-754 BC

Iuput
(meryamun-sibastet)
Usermaatre
754-715 BC

At Herakleopolis
Peftjauabastet
Neferkare

At Herakleopolis
Nimlot

Dynasty 24 ( at Sais )
727 -715 BC

Tefnakht
Shepsesre
727-720 BC

Bakenrenef
(Bocchoris)
Wahkare
720-715 BC

Ancient Egyptian
Often referred to as the Libyan or Bubastite dynasty, the 22nd Dynasty immediately betrays its origins. Manetho lists the kings as all being from Bubastis in the eastern Delta and the Libyan element is evident in the founder, Sheshonq I, who inaugurated the sequence of Libyan chiefs who were to rule Egypt for the next 200 years. Sheshonq himself, allied by marriage as the son-in- Law of his predecessor, Psusennes II, had the Sheshonq was a strong ruler who brought the divided factions of Thebes and Tanis together into a once more united Egypt.

Calculated appointments of his sons to various high offices meant that he exercised specific control over important areas of the country. Uniting the religious and secular spheres, his son Iuput was Governor of Upper Egypt and at the same time both High Priest of Amun and commander-in- chief of the armies. Another son, Djedptahaufankh, supported his brother in the religious field as Third Prophet of Amun. Yet another son, Nimlot, acted as military commander at Herakleopolis, an important garrison that could keep Thebes in check, if need be, to the south. With such a stable power base at home, Sheshonq could then turn his gaze outwards to the old Egyptian Near Eastern possessions.

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